Tag: Jane Austen

Jane

Jane

Emma Knightley, handsome, clever, and rich, with a disposition almost always happy – an exception being when her little William, her sweet son, would start screeching because of some offense received, either real or imaginary – united some the best blessings in existence even if, having […]

How To Dress Like You’re In A Jane Austen Novel

How To Dress Like You’re In A Jane Austen Novel

Fashion has many sources of inspiration; style even more so. Be it a decade, a film, a movement—adopting the look of another can have a comforting solidarity. While a good story will have you immersed enough with its words, I like a method approach, and […]

Rereading Austen

Rereading Austen

A Note from the Editor: Today marks the bicentennial of Jane Austen’s death. As we here at the Attic are a proud bunch of Janeites, we decided that we’d mark the week* with a trio of Austen posts to show what she means to us. To begin, I’m sharing a short piece I wrote for my university magazine back in 2013 on discovering humor in Austen. On Thursday, Abigail will share a piece on contemporary rewritings of Pride and Prejudice that she presented at a conference last spring, and on Saturday, Rory will reveal a creative piece inspired by Austen!  

* celebrate doesn’t quite seem the word to use considering Austen’s early death


Rereading Austen

Jane Austen here, Jane Austen there… You’ve probably all noticed by this point that 2013 seems to be the year of all things Austen. There are new films, books, and articles coming out of every nook and cranny, from the silly to the serious, with everyone from the New Yorker to the Bank of England taking part. Officially, this is all because it’s Pride and Prejudice’s bicentennial and Pride and Prejudice is incontestably Austen’s most famous work. Unofficially, though? Anyone who loves Austen will simply jump at any occasion to celebrate her work.

To play my passive part in the celebrations, I decided against mock Regency balls and Austen theme parks and decided, instead, to do the “rational” thing and reread each and every one of Austen’s novels throughout the year. It doesn’t sound like a daunting feat, but with mandatory readings and theoretical texts piling towards the ceiling and a stack of lovingly chosen yet never-read classics that will no longer even fit on a shelf, it’s easier said than done. Still, I’ve made my way through all but one, revisiting even Sanditon along the way. With so many new books to discover, I wondered, at first, whether re-reading these old favorites was a frivolous thing to do, but as I’ve often noted before, and yet can’t seem to remember, rereading favorites is almost always good.

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Eight Gentler Women’s Novels

Eight Gentler Women’s Novels

Often, when reading fiction that’s specifically been written by women, we end up reading darker fiction. Feminist literature is socially critical by nature, and even most novels written by women writers in the past few centuries but not flagged as feminist literature can easily be tools for […]